01-01-03 or 967

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From: "PUBYAC: PUBlic librarians serving Young Adults and Children" <pubyac@prairienet.org>
To: "PUBYAC: PUBlic librarians serving Young Adults and Children" <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2003 7:28 PM
Subject: PUBYAC digest 967


    PUBYAC Digest 967

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) Job Posting - Librarian II, Children's Department
by "Christine Neirink" <c.neirink@vlc.lib.mi.us>
  2) Re: Children's Music Websites
by Susie Johnson <srrlys@neflin.org>
  3) Teen Parents Grant
by L larsen <llarsen64@yahoo.com>
  4) Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
by L larsen <llarsen64@yahoo.com>
  5) Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
by cora ciampi <talescj@yahoo.com>
  6) Fw: Literary Rambles
by "Susan Preece" <susanmpreece@westchesterlibraries.org>
  7) Re: snow craft
by Frances Easterling <machild@cmrls.lib.ms.us>
  8) Re: snow craft
by "Donna Moran" <domoran@hotmail.com>
  9) Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
by Eric Norton <enorton@scls.lib.wi.us>
 10) RE: Restricting what child patrons can check out
by "Linette Ivanovitch" <linette@missoula.lib.mt.us>
 11) Scottish craft?
by "Wilson, Amy (Library)" <amy.wilson@nashville.gov>
 12) Beanie Babies to finger puppet compilation
by "Wilson, Amy (Library)" <amy.wilson@nashville.gov>
 13) Re: snow craft
by "Baraboo Children's Dept." <barch@scls.lib.wi.us>
 14) RE: Safety theme
by "Katy Grant" <imzadi@thepoint.net>
 15) Re: snow craft
by "Carol and Gary Levin" <cglevin@access4less.net>
 16) Re: bicycle storytime
by "Carol and Gary Levin" <cglevin@access4less.net>
 17) Fw: More about the Trip!
by "Susan Preece" <susanmpreece@westchesterlibraries.org>

----------------------------------------------------------------------
From: "Christine Neirink" <c.neirink@vlc.lib.mi.us>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Job Posting - Librarian II, Children's Department
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:13:58 CST

This job vacancy within the Bay County Library System (Bay County,
Michigan) was posted on pubyac yesterday.  Because the attachment -
the official job posting - didn't make it through the listproc, I
have copied it and am resubmitting it below.  Questions regarding
this position can be directed to Assistant Director Trish Burns at
989/894-2837, ext. 215, (t.burns@vlc.lib.mi.us).

Happy New Year! 

***************************************
JOB VACANCY - BAY COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Librarian II - Children's Department
December 30, 2002


ASSIGNMENT:  Responsible for the management, operation, and
supervision of the children's department at the Bay City Branch
Library.  Provides references services; develops children's
collection; creates and carries out storytimes and craft programs.

WAGE:  $37,356 - 44,846

HOURS:  Salaried position, 40 hours per week, regularly scheduled
Monday through Saturday, evening and weekend work required

VACATION:  Twenty days annually.  After five years of service an
additional day per year up to a total of 25 days annually.

PERSONAL DAYS:  3 days

SICK:  Earned at 1 day per month.  Accumulate to 90 days. After 90
days, sick days may be exchanged for vacation at 2:1 up to three
days/year.

RETIREMENT:  Bay County Employees' Retirement Plan (paid by Library).

HEALTH INS:  Blue Cross/Blue Shield or a $1,000 deferred compensation
annual contribution in lieu of health insurance.  (Employee currently
pays %5 of premium)

DENTAL INS:  Single or family dental coverage. (Employee pays %5 of
premium) 

LIFE INS:  $20,000 life/AD&D insurance policy on employee; long term
disability

PROBATION:  First year

AVAILABLE:  January 2003

APPLICATION DATE:  Send letter of application and resume by 5:00p.m.
Friday, January 17, 2003

Personnel Department
Bay County Library System
307 Lafayette Avenue
Bay City, MI  48708

------------------------------
From: Susie Johnson <srrlys@neflin.org>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: Children's Music Websites
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:15:09 CST

April,
My library began a small CD collection about 2 yrs. ago.  I use AEC
Onestop.  The CDs are discounted and orders come quickly and complete.
Discounts are based on the CD being from a major label or an independent
label.  They send out a monthly catalog that has a special section for
children's music called kid-stop.  The web address is www.aent.com.  The
first time you sign up, you have to contact the company.  I have been
very
pleased with this company.

HTH,
Susie Johnson
Suwannee River Regional Library

*Have a Happy New Year!!!*

------------------------------
From: L larsen <llarsen64@yahoo.com>
To: PUBYAC@prairienet.org
Subject: Teen Parents Grant
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:16:00 CST



Hi All,

A co-worker here has obtained a grant to purchase materials specifically
for pregnant and teen mothers in our community.  He will be linking with
various organizations around the city to invite them in when the
materials are here.  We have decided to do "kits" instead of instituting
an entirely new collection, we already have "grandparent kits" that are
popular.  The materials will be put into kits by theme; new baby, health
and nutrition, read to your baby, etc...  Kits will include print and
non-print materials, and board books to share with baby. 

My question is, do any of you have any great, can't-miss titles to
share?  The kits will be in English and Spanish and must contain the
easiest of materials.  We have already found some great titles in the
publication Criticas - high/low materials and videos that fit into our
grant.  If you have any ideas we would really appreciate it!  Please
e-mail me off list, and I will compile if there is interest.

Thanks in advance and Happy New Year!

 

Laura Larsen

Russell Library, Middletown, CT

llarsen@russell.lioninc.org

------------------------------
From: L larsen <llarsen64@yahoo.com>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:16:54 CST


If you do a lot of crafts with your story hours an Ellison machine and a
set of dies is an excellent purchase, I can't tell you how much time it
has saved on nametag cutting and craft prep!
Laura Larsen, Children's Librarian, Russell Library, Middletown, CT


 Sharon Castanteen <sharoncast482002@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hi I recently got $1,000 to spend on "something" for the children's
>department.
>Any ideas? What would you buy?

------------------------------
From: cora ciampi <talescj@yahoo.com>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:17:29 CST


buy whatever your regular budget cannot purchase. cora
jo

--- Sharon Castanteen <sharoncast482002@yahoo.com>
wrote:
>
>
> Hi I recently got $1,000 to spend on "something" for
> the children's
> department.
> Any ideas?  What would you buy? 

------------------------------
From: "Susan Preece" <susanmpreece@westchesterlibraries.org>
To: <PUBYAC@prairienet.org>,
    <carolbirch@earthlink.net>
Subject: Fw: Literary Rambles
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:18:57 CST


To all PUBYACers--Carol Birch is an outstanding storyteller and
librarian at the Chappaqua Library, in Westchester County, NY.  Do not
miss out on this great opportunity to travel with such warm and
entertaining company--you will not be disappointed!
Susan M. Preece
Chappaqua Library

---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
From: "Carol Birch" <cbirch@westchesterlibraries.org>
Reply-To: <cbirch@westchesterlibraries.org>
Date:  Mon, 30 Dec 2002 20:37:31 -0500

Literary Rambles through Enchanted Places:
>From Pooh to Potter - From Cottage to Castle - From England to Scotland

Join us for a unique trip across England from Milne's Hundred Acre Wood
through Lewis Carroll's Oxford, Jane Austin's Bath and on to Beatrix
Potter's Lake District. From the Lake District we head north to Scotland
to visit the palaces in Edinburgh, St. Andrew's University and
Cathedral.
The grand highlight of this trip will be a special seminar at Jane
Yolen's beautiful manor home in St. Andrews, complete with formal tea
with Jane and
her family. August 3-13, 2003.

Day 1 - Depart USA from Boston
Day 2 - Arrive at Heathrow airport. Through timeless enchantments of an
English countryside, we'll motor to wooded sites immortalized in
drawings
by Ernest Shepard for A. A. Milne's classic  stories.  After visiting
rustic sites in the Hundred Acre Wood  -- Pooh sticks anyone? -- we'll
relax in gardens at the home of Rudyard Kipling. Overnight in Oxford.
B,D

Day 3 - Oxford!  Where C. S. Lewis, Lewis Carroll, Oscar Wilde and other
children's literature luminaries studied and taught. A city to enjoy on
foot, we'll tour two city jewels -- the Bodleian Library and Sheldonian
Theatre.  Afternoon is free for informal strolls across the deer park at
Magdalena College, or through Christ Church Meadows, or to the grave of
Kenneth Graham. Or, hop aboard public transport for a 20 minute ride to
Blenheim Palace. Optional Evensong service at  Christ Church precedes a
cruise on the River Thames, where Lewis Carroll's stories for Alice
began. Overnight in Oxford. B

Day 4 - We're off to enjoy the quintessential English landscape of
golden stones and hedgerows in the Cotswolds. The Cotswolds are among
the best
preserved rural districts of England. We'll travel to an 18th Century
architectural folly, Broadway Tower. From 65 feet high, 13 counties are
visible.  If it's not raining, those with stamina and sturdy boots can
spend an hour on a brief, glorious ramble on right-of-ways which
crisscross the countryside. Others, not so inclined, can motor into
Broadway to sip, or shop, before we all continue to a tiny sequestered
hamlet where Owlpen Manor sits. Each afternoon this 900 year old Tudor
Manor is open to the public. Unforgettably picturesque and snug, it's
untouched by time. Overnight in Bath. B

Day 5 - "Who can ever be tired of Bath," wrote Jane Austin in Northanger
Abbey.  Morning tours include: the Jane Austen Center and #1 Royal
Crescent. The Royal Crescent represents the highest point of Palladian
architecture in Bath. Only materials available in the 18th century were
used in extensive
renovations and decorations. Afternoon is free for indulging!  The Pump
Room for lunch? The Roman Baths for history? Shopping in this charming
city?
After dinner at Sally Lunn's (voted Englands FINEST tea room in 2002),
we'll return to the hotel where storyteller Patrick Ryan will tell
stories and talk about Shakespeare's use of folktales in his plays.
Overnight in Bath. B

Day 6 - While enjoying a lovely ride to the Lake District, we'll stop in
Stratfor-Upon-Avon, a city that figures large in Englis literature.
We'll visit Shakespeare's birthplace, Trinity Church and Anne Hathaway's
Cottage, then take time to explore this fine example of an Elizabethan
town. From  there, it's on to our hotel in Grasmere a charming village
of slate cottages sited on a wood-fringed lake. Overnight in Grasmere.
B, D

Day 7 - Step into the extraordinary homes of three literary icons:
Beatrix Potter's Hill Top, William Wordsworth's Dove Cottage, and John
Ruskin's Brantwood.  We'll have the chance to experience first hand the
landscapes and 'waters' whose expansive beauty astounded each author and
informed
their work. Overnight in Greasmere. B, D

Day 8 - We travel to historic St. Andrews,  Scotland's oldest university
town, founded in the fourth century in honor of their patron saint. En
route from England to Scotland we'll dine at "Brigadoon" in Ayr. After
riding from England to Scotland, we'll enjoy stretching our legs as we
explore the ruins of St. Andrews Cathedral -- founded in 1160, finished
in 1318 and plundered
by supporters of John Knox who left it to ruin. Overnight in St.
Andrews. B, D

Day 9 - This morning we visit St. Andrew's University, the oldest in
Scotland founded in 1410 by Bishop Henry Wardlaw. Jane Yolen and her
family
have extended a warm invitation to come for tea. The afternoon's
seminar, in their unique manor house, may include a Scotish folksinger.
Overnight in Edinburgh. B

Day 10 - A day in Edinburgh! In the morning we'll view the Palace of
Holyroodhouse, with its  associations to the present Royal Family and
the
violent history of Mary, Queen of Scots. Wile away the afternoon with
final rambles through Edinburgh Castle, the Museum of Childhood, or
along the aptly named Royal Mile. On our last night together, we'll
celebrate with a "Literary Pub" tour of the city. Whatever the
libations, we'll share a cup and savor memories. Overnight in Edinburgh.
B

Day 11 - Return to the USA.

Included in this package:
Roundtrip Airfare from Boston; Transport by Luxury Motorcoach; Deluxe
Accommodations for 9 nights; 8 Full Breakfasts; 4 Table d'hote Dinners;
Porterage, service charges and government taxes.

Paid admission fees to: Rudyard Kipling's Batemans; Bodleian Library;
Sheldonian Theatre; Boatride on the Thames; Broadway Tower; Owlpen
Manor; Jane Austen Center; Royal Crescent Museum; Shakespeare's
Birthplace; Anne Hathaway's Cottage; Beatrix  Potter's Hill Top;
Wordsworth's Dove Cottage;  Gondola Ride on Coniston Waters; John
Ruskin's Brantwood; St.Andrew's Cathedral; St. Andrew's University;
Palace of Holyroodhouse; Edinburgh Castle.

Cost Per Participant: $2694.00. Single Room Supplement: $400.00.
Departure Taxes: $56 per person.

For additional terms and information please contact:
Wendy Nowlan via phone 203.392.5711 or email - r.nowlan@snet.net
Marsh Passmore via phone 423.282.5126 or email - Lhpdgp@cs.com
Carol Birch via phone 203.264.3800 or email - carolbirch@earthlink.net


--
Carol L. Birch, Storyteller
32B Heritage Circle
Southbury CT 06488
203-264-3800 hm
914-238-3597 fax
--

------------------------------
From: Frances Easterling <machild@cmrls.lib.ms.us>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: snow craft
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:19:47 CST


I mix shaving cream and glue together and let the children paint it on a
black poster board.  They love it!! Frances from Magee Library

Nancy Bonne wrote:

> Does anyone out there in PUBYAC land know a really cool, foolproof
craft
>
> for a snow-theme story hour for 3-5 year-olds?  The old  "glue the
> cotton
> balls on the snowman shape"  is about all we can think of.  We spend
> about
> 5 minutes (with lots of pre-cutting) at the end of story hour on
> crafts...thanks in advance!   nancy bonne   bonne@noblenet.org
> Nancy Bonne
> Children's Librarian
> Beverly Public Library
> bonne@noblenet.org

------------------------------
From: "Donna Moran" <domoran@hotmail.com>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: snow craft
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:20:21 CST

This year I'm just cutting out white paper circles in 3 different sizes
so
that they kids can make any kind of snowman they like (and hopefully, as

many as they like).  Then we'll sprinkle the entire picture with salt
for
that "glitter" effect -- which will stick to the glue that they've
managed
to get all over!  In the past I've made snowmen out of paper plates.
The
kids staple the plates together in the snowman shape and then glue on
precut
construction paper circles for buttons and a precut hat.  I always offer
a
large supply of items, and in many colors so that they can have the fun
of
choosing.

Donna Moran
Fresno County Library






>From: Nancy Bonne <bonne@noblenet.org>
>Reply-To: pubyac@prairienet.org
>To: PUBYAC@prairienet.org
>Subject: snow craft
>Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2002 00:34:34 CST
>
>Does anyone out there in PUBYAC land know a really cool, foolproof
craft
>
>for a snow-theme story hour for 3-5 year-olds?  The old  "glue the
>cotton balls on the snowman shape"  is about all we can think of.  We
spend
>about 5 minutes (with lots of pre-cutting) at the end of story hour on
>crafts...thanks in advance!   nancy bonne   bonne@noblenet.org
>Nancy Bonne
>Children's Librarian
>Beverly Public Library
>bonne@noblenet.org


_________________________________________________________________
Protect your PC - get McAfee.com VirusScan Online
http://clinic.mcafee.com/clinic/ibuy/campaign.asp?cid=3963

------------------------------
From: Eric Norton <enorton@scls.lib.wi.us>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: Furniture? Equipment? I've got a big donation...
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:20:57 CST

Sharon:
will this donation be something that will have the donor's name attached
to
it in some way?  That's always an important consideration.  Things we've

done here over the years with sizable donations include starting new
collections or creating new collections ( buying our first ever CDROMs
vs.
collecting together all of our holiday books into a holiday collection
and
then increasing it's size greatly), buying computers, display furniture
(both of those went along with the CDROMs), comfy furniture (both kid
sized
and parent sized) and original artworks.  Our thought has always been to

buy things that are very visible so that the donor or their heirs would
see
that their money was well and prominently spent if they happen to come
in
to the department.  With that rational, we've avoided buying much
equipment
for departmental use (die cut machines, button makers, etc.).  The other

thing that we've done with donated money is present live entertainment.
I
don't know what the going rate is in New Jersey but, depending on the
quality and the size of the act (multiple people acts always cost more
for
obvious reasons) I would be able to present between one and five shows
with
$1K.  This is a very high visibility way to spend a donation but unless
you
have a way to continue the programming it works best for a limited
program
series (summer programs, programs during spring break one year, etc.)
Good
luck and have fun spending.

------------------------------
From: "Linette Ivanovitch" <linette@missoula.lib.mt.us>
To: jstoltz@esls.lib.wi.us, pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: RE: Restricting what child patrons can check out
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:21:49 CST


Whoa--I would have been just as shocked as you.  I am sure he was trying
to pacify
the mother but this goes against EVERYTHING the Library Bill of Rights
and
Freedom to Read statement stand for!
Library Bill of Rights: http://www.ala.org/work/freedom/lbr.html#rights
Freedom to Read: http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oif/freeread.html

Our library has a very firm policy of non-interference when it comes to
patrons,
regardless of age.  When a parent signs a library application for a
minor, right above
the signature is this statement: "I understand that children have access
to all
materials in the Library, and I accept responsibility for monitoring my
child's access
to print, media, and electronic formats, including the Internet."  We
feel very strongly
about this at our library.  How could we possibly keep track?  And if
you block Harry
Potter, then is Wizard of Oz ok?  What about the Smurfs (I once had a
parent
complain to me that Papa Smurf did a spell in one little paperback book.
Is it ONLY
those two books the parent expects the library to censor, or ALL books
of the same
subject.  And who has the time to scrutinize every book that little
Billy has in his pile. 
And as far as being a Lutheran class, I have a dear friend who is a
Lutheran minister
who LOVES Harry Potter, and in fact has used his good-against evil
struggles and
Harry's internal good-v-evil struggles in his sermons, even!  So who can
make the
judgement about what is ok or not EXCEPT for the parents?? And what
happens if
something "slips through"?  Does this open the library up for liability,
since basically
the parent had a contract with the library to keep these materials out
of the hands of
the kid?

Montana state law is very clear on the subject.  The state constitution
affords minors
the same rights to privacy as adults.  The only time we are allowed to
divulge library
records to even a parent is if the materials are overdue, have accrued
fines, or must
be paid for due to loss or damage.  Many parents are taken aback when we
tell them
that we can't, by law, tell them what their three-year-old has out.  We
assume,
however,  that if a parent has the kid's card, that the kid has given
permission for the
parent to look at the record.  Kind of a grey area, I know, but it
allows us to tell Mom
what books they are searching the toy box for.  We also allow kids 15
and up to
obtain their own card w/o parental permission. 

We have almost every fifth grade class in our city visit during a
combined art
museum/library event over the course of the year.  At the beginning of
each tour we
state something to the effect of "You are getting older, and the older
you get, the
more rights you get.  What comes with every right?  Yup, a
responsibility.  OK--here's
your right at our library.  You are allowed to check out anything in our
library. We
have R-rated movies, books with mature content, and parental-advisory
CD's. 
Here's your responsibility--you have to make sure that anything you
check out meets
your family rules.  Everyone's family rules are different, and everyone
of you is an
individual.  Some of you read better than others, some of you are more
mature than
others, and some of your parents have different views and beliefs that
others.  I
cannot possibly know any of you as well as your parents.  Only your
parents know
you well enough to know what is appropriate or inappropriate for YOU.
How could I
possibly remember EVERYONE's family rules?  If you are not sure if
something you
want to check out meets your family rules, then you have two choices.
You can
leave the materials at the library, or if you choose to check them out,
you can show
them to your parents and ASK if they meet your family rules BEFORE you
read/view/hear the materials.  Guess what I am going to say if your
parents comes
here all upset because you checked out something they don't approve of?
Yup, I am
going to tell them about this conversation.  Who do you think they are
going to decide
has the responsibility for deciding what you chose?"

I know, sounds pretty boring, but we get into a pretty lively
discussion.  And I have
never had a parental complaint in the three years I've been doing the
tours.  You did
not mention how old the student was, so perhaps the kids were younger.
But I have
found that kids are usually pretty clear, and at a very early age, what
parents think is
or is not ok. 

Linette Ivanovitch
YA Librarian and crusader for Intellectual Freedom
Missoula Public Library
Missoula, MT

On 31 Dec 2002 at 0:23, Jennie Stoltz wrote:

> Friends,
>
> I need your help.  Recently I had an angry mother call me because she
> was upset that we had allowed her child to check out a Harry
> Potter-like book on witchcraft.  She said she was amazed that we had
> "allowed" the child to check the book out especially because her
> daughter was on a class visit to the library from a Lutheran school.
> I explained to the woman that we did not limit what any of the
> children who use our library can or cannot check out and that she
> would either have to have the teacher restrict what the child could
> check out or not allow the child to check anything out at all without
> her being present.  She said that she knew other libraries restricted
> what children could check out and I said I had not heard of that. She
> named two university libraries in the area and I said I did not
> believe that was the case, especially since only adults used those
> libraries (I think she was thinking about materials on reserve.)
>
> Anyhow, trying to make a long story not so long, she asked to speak to
> my supervisor so I passed her along to my director.  I assumed that he
> was on the same page as me so I did not review with him what I had
> said.  Now, after the fact of course, I find out that he has agreed to
> put a block on the child's library card restricting her from checking
> out two particular titles.  When I began to tell him that this was
> opening up the possibility for a deluge of requests from mothers
> wanting to restrict certain materials from their children, not to
> mention the fact that this was putting a lot of responsibility on the
> circulation staff who might not know a particular book is about
> witchcraft,etc., he just said to me that he has done this before and
> not to worry about it.  (Maybe I shouldn't mention that he said that
> since I don't have any kids I just couldn't understand - he really is
> a nice guy, I think that maybe he was having a bad day.)
>
> What I need from you is any opinions, experiences, facts, data,
> information,
> ANYTHING that I could take to him to show him how wrong this is.  I'm
> trying to basically build a case.  I don't know if he can change
> anything now, he's already told the mother that we would do this, but
> I do know that the woman who is our Circulation Coordinator is just
> about as angry as I am.
>
> HELP!
>
> Thanks and Happy New Year!
>
> Jennie Stoltz
>
> P.S.  Please reply directly to me at jstoltz@esls.lib.wi.us.

------------------------------
From: "Wilson, Amy (Library)" <amy.wilson@nashville.gov>
To: "'pubyac@prairienet.org'" <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: Scottish craft?
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:22:28 CST


Does anyone have a craft idea for a Scottish Festival?

My library has an employee who is from Scotland and she and her son will
do
a program for my K-6 storytime on Jan. 23. I thought a simple coloring
sheet
would do, but I can't find anything on the internet that will work. I
have
asked my co-worker, but she says she is not crafty and can't think of
anything either.

Any help would be appreciated. Please reply to: amy.wilson@nashville.gov

--Amy Wilson
Children's Department
Hermitage Branch Library
3700 James Kay Lane
Hermitage, TN 37076
amy.wilson@nashville.gov
Public Library of Nashville/Davidson County

------------------------------
From: "Wilson, Amy (Library)" <amy.wilson@nashville.gov>
To: "'pubyac@prairienet.org'" <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: Beanie Babies to finger puppet compilation
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:23:09 CST


Dear PUBYACers,

My branch recently had more than 100 Ty Beanie Babies donated and I
asked if
anyone had suggestions on how to convert them for use as finger puppets.
Thank you to those who responded.

While waiting to see if more suggestions would come in, the children's
librarian has attempted and achieved some good results. She picked some
Beanie Babies that had a seam where she thought the finger should go and
ripped it open. She removed the little plastic pellets used as filling
and,
if neccessary, used polyester fiber fill to add some stiffness. And
that's
it! Instant finger puppet!

Here is the compliation:

The easiest way I know is to take the fabric from a sock. Cut it to fit
around your finger snugly. Sew up the side of the fabric and across the
top
to make a tube that is open at the bottom where your finger fits in, but
closed at the top where your fingertip is. Cut the stitches at the
bottom
seam of the toy. With the tube on your finger, push the tube up into the
toy. You may have to remove some stuffing. Once it's in place, turn up a
1/4" hem on the tube with the raw edge to the outside of the tube.
Stitch
the finger tube to the body of the toy along the fold of the hem. The
raw
edge is now hidden inside the toy. If there is no handy seam in the toy
for
opening to place the finger tube inside, then cut a slit. Turn the raw
edges
of the slit to the inside of the toy. Place the finger tube with the
folded
hem. Stitch the fold of the hem to the fold of the slit with tiny
stitches.

If the toy is too small for a finger tube, stitch a loop of elastic to
the
back of the puppet. Just slip your finger into the loop and the puppet
will
stay on your finger. Your finger shows, but kids don't seem to care.

Congratulations of the gift of the Beanie Babies!
Lori Karns
Ventura County Library

Hope this helps.

______________________________________________________

Why make them into puppets?  I use my daughter's beanie babies all the
time
(she has over 400) and just use them as props for the stories as I tell
them.  I try to hide the beanies behind something, then as I tell the
story
about this animal or that color, I pop the beanie up and then line them
up
in a row.  The kids love it.

mmp

______________________________________________________

I've used them for participative stories or songs with the kids.  One
song
that gets a lot of mileage for lapsit/toddler/preschool programs is to
sing
"When Ducks Get Up in the Morning" as we pull animal beanies out a
drawstring bag. "What's in Fox's Sack" is another possibility for the
bag
and beanies.  I'm sure you'll come up with more!

______________________________________________________

Again, thank you to those who responded. PUBYAC rocks!

Amy Wilson
Children's Department
Hermitage Branch Library
3700 James Kay Lane
Hermitage, TN 37076
amy.wilson@nashville.gov
Public Library of Nashville/Davidson County

------------------------------
From: "Baraboo Children's Dept." <barch@scls.lib.wi.us>
To: pubyac@prairienet.org
Subject: Re: snow craft
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:24:00 CST


Hi,

This is not fancy but our kids had fun with it.  We made "pockets" with
small bubble wrap. Large enough for them to slip two-four fingers in
(depending on their age and size). Hot glue the edges.
Put white paint on the table on something flat (we used lids from ice
cream
buckets) and let them dip into the paint and pat the snow onto blue
paper.
We've had a few kids who say they are making a snowstorm.  Some dot just
a
few on the paper.

Karen and Beth
Baraboo



At 12:34 AM 12/31/2002 -0600, you wrote:

>Does anyone out there in PUBYAC land know a really cool, foolproof
craft
>
>for a snow-theme story hour for 3-5 year-olds?  The old  "glue the
>cotton balls on the snowman shape"  is about all we can think of.  We
spend
>about 5 minutes (with lots of pre-cutting) at the end of story hour on
>crafts...thanks in advance!   nancy bonne   bonne@noblenet.org
>Nancy Bonne
>Children's Librarian
>Beverly Public Library
>bonne@noblenet.org
>
>
>

Youth Services Staff
Baraboo Public Library
230 4th Ave., Baraboo WI  53913
Phone: 608-356-6166   FAX: 608-355-2779
barch@scls.lib.wi.us

------------------------------
From: "Katy Grant" <imzadi@thepoint.net>
To: <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: RE: Safety theme
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:24:59 CST

The traffic light reproduction is a good idea, and you might want to
make a
larger 3D version out of a large paper juice container. For example,
each of
the four sides would have four possible choices of lights red, yellow,
green
and a green arrow turning left or right. Just make one light on each
side
out of a darker color indicating that this is the light that is
currently
on. If you leave the bottom in tact and work from the opening in the top
you
run a dow through the bottom of the container so it would be tall enough
for
all to see. You could either turn it yourself to show the different
lights
or have a young "patroller" do it. There is also a new web site you
might
want to check out; www.clueintosaftey.com . Depending on how far you
want to
go you could have a street map (probably no more then five short blocks)
of
a small area of your city  or just a generic street map and have the
children decide where the stop signs should go, caution signs such a
school
areas and traffic lights. You could print out some mini buildings and
stuff
for kids to paste on or have all building already in place and just let
them
put of signs where the children think they should go.

Katy Grant
Shawnee Branch Children's Librarian
Louisville Free Public Library
Louisville, KY
katy@lfpl.org

From: "Kidstaff" <KIDSTAFF@mx.tol.lib.ca.us>
To: <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: Re: Safety theme

Have the children make reproduction traffic lights and color them red,
yellow and green.  They can cut them out and play a game similar to
Simon Says where the storyteller points to each color and the children
walk, stop, pause etc. to reinforce what each color is for.  This is a
nice activity because it combines a craft and a movement  activity
together.

Barbara Poole
Library Assistant
Thousand Oaks Library
Thousand Oaks, California

>>> p.stack@vlc.lib.mi.us 12/28/02 11:12PM >>>
Hi Pubyaccers,
I am looking for ideas for a bike safety theme storytime for kids in
the 1st and 2nd grades.  I have a policeperson coming to talk and I
know of someone who was injured who will come and speak.  I need some
craft ideas to tie into the theme.  Any other ideas would be greatly
appreciated also!  THANKS!
**********************************************************************
Run

------------------------------
From: "Carol and Gary Levin" <cglevin@access4less.net>
To: <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: Re: snow craft
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:25:07 CST


I really like reading Ehlert's "Snowballs" and then providing materials
similar to what she uses (her pictures are collages full of found
materials)
and letting the kids make their own snowmen.  It is a great way to use
up
bits of this and that that we have lying around our dept. and homes.
The
only preparation required (other than gathering the stuff) is cutting
out
three graduated white paper circles to form the snowman -- and even this
step is optional if parents are around to do it.
Materials:
White construction paper
Glue and/or gluesticks
Seeds, corn, fabric scraps, pasta, feathers, ribbon, pom-poms, and
whatever
else you can find...
Approx. 12x18" pieces of Cardboard (optional, but useful if you are
providing heavy items for decorations, because kids can glue their
snowman
to a piece of cardboard to keep it from "flopping.") -- the cardboard at
the
bottom of our Baker and Taylor boxes work perfectly.

Carol and Gary Levin
144 Smoke Rise Road
Bedminster NJ 07921
908 781 6041
Enjoy Life! This is not a Dress Rehearsal!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Nancy Bonne" <bonne@noblenet.org>
To: <PUBYAC@prairienet.org>
Sent: Tuesday, December 31, 2002 1:34 AM
Subject: snow craft


> Does anyone out there in PUBYAC land know a really cool, foolproof
craft
>
> for a snow-theme story hour for 3-5 year-olds?  The old  "glue the
> cotton
> balls on the snowman shape"  is about all we can think of.  We spend
> about
> 5 minutes (with lots of pre-cutting) at the end of story hour on
> crafts...thanks in advance!   nancy bonne   bonne@noblenet.org
> Nancy Bonne
> Children's Librarian
> Beverly Public Library
> bonne@noblenet.org
>
>

------------------------------
From: "Carol and Gary Levin" <cglevin@access4less.net>
To: <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Subject: Re: bicycle storytime
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:25:31 CST

I do a bicycle storytime -- it is not exclusively on bicycle safety, but
maybe some of the ideas would work for you:

"Wheel Away -- Bikes and Trikes"

Book:  Stella and Roy -- Woolf (Tortoise and the Hare story retold with
a
tricycle)
song:  Bumping up and down in my little red wagon.

Book: Mrs. Armitage on Wheels -- Quentin Blake  (Mrs. A. likes a bike
with a
few extra gadgets ... but watch out what happens when she makes her
"improvements"...)

Flannel/Song (using pieces made from Mrs. Armitage)
        The wheels on the bike go round and round  all around the town.
                horns                        beep, beep, beep
                buckets                    splash, splash, splash
                toolbox                    rattle, rattle, rattle
                food                    tastes yum, yum, yum
                dog                            pant, pant, pant
                rain                            splash, splash, splash
                radio                          sing, sing, sing
                sail                             whosh, whosh, whosh
         Mrs. Armitage's Crazy bike goes CRASH, CRASH, CRASH ...

Book(younger audiences):  Mama Zooms  -- Cowen-Fletcher
Book(for those learning to ride a two-wheeler):  Magic Bicycle --
Doherty
(Alternate books:  Chas. T. McBiddle -- Glass.  Little Red Riding Hood:
a
Newfangled Prairie Tale -- Lisa Campbell Ernst.)

video:  Remarkable Riderless Tricycle
or filmstrip:  The Bear's Bicycle

Carol and Gary Levin
144 Smoke Rise Road
Bedminster NJ 07921
908 781 6041
Enjoy Life! This is not a Dress Rehearsal!
----- Original Message -----
From: "P Stack" <p.stack@vlc.lib.mi.us>
To: <pubyac@prairienet.org>
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2002 2:12 AM


> Hi Pubyaccers,
> I am looking for ideas for a bike safety theme storytime for kids in
> the 1st and 2nd grades.  I have a policeperson coming to talk and I
> know of someone who was injured who will come and speak.  I need some
> craft ideas to tie into the theme.  Any other ideas would be greatly
> appreciated also!  THANKS!
> **********************************************************************
> Run
>
>

------------------------------
From: "Susan Preece" <susanmpreece@westchesterlibraries.org>
To: <PUBYAC@prairienet.org>,
    <cbirch@westchesterlibraries.org>
Subject: Fw: More about the Trip!
Date: Wed,  1 Jan 2003 20:28:06 CST


More on a great trip!!
Susan M. Preece
Chappaqua Library
---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
From: "Carol Birch" <cbirch@westchesterlibraries.org>
Reply-To: <cbirch@westchesterlibraries.org>
Date:  Mon, 30 Dec 2002 20:43:36 -0500

Dear Friends and Fellow Travelers,
If you haven't received a brochure of the trip across England -- with
Scotland too! -- that I've planned for years? If not, let me know and
I'll send one.

Are you coming on the trip? I hope so!  We have a special thank you for
those who reserve their space before the end of January. You'll receive
a gift... Hint: it has to do with books, children and England. Hmmmm. It
will be a treat to enjoy on winter nights as you sip tea and dream of
our journey in August.

On this trip it is my fervent hope we'll enjoy a kind of "stations of
the word." At a site or on route, wouldn't it be grand to hear a brief
passage
from a book appropriate to the place or author? Contact me directly and
we'll plan what selection - bit of story, poem, description, essay -
you'd  like to read (or tell?) from: A. A. Milne, Rudyard Kipling, C.S.
Lewis, Kenneth Grahame, Lewis Carroll, Miss Read (or anyone) on the
Cotswolds,
Jane Austen, Shakespeare, Beatrix Potter, Wordsworth, Ruskin, or one of
Jane Yolen's books set in Scotland.

We'll make time to savor passages from books that capture or celebrate
all things English or Scottish... characters, landscapes, foods, drinks,
clothing, homes, et al. YOU DON'T HAVE TO read, tell, or even listen.
This is just for fun for people who want to play this way. My email is
carolbirch@earthlink.net.

IF YOU ARE TAKING THE TRIP, TWO SUGGESTIONS:
Bring dry a twig-or two-for playing Pooh sticks in your
CARRY-oN-LUGGAGE. Ashdown Forest is a stop on the day we arrive BEFORE
we unpack. The ground
around the bridge is picked clean. Since it is a rural spot, commercial
Popsicle sticks, pencils, etc. would NOT be appropriate.

And, PLEASE Wear sturdy, BROKEN-IN hiking boots, not sneakers. There are
three places where we'll be tramping across rough terrain. If you are
not
wearing HIGH hiking boots, chances are you'll twist an ankle and ruin
the rest of the trip for yourself (and in the end for all of us). I just
went to
England to check out some of these spots. I was more comfortable in
hiking boots on rustic paths, rights of way, and city streets. Think
Annie-Hall,
it's a look; more importantly, think comfort --that's a fact!

Carol-Can't-wait-to-be-I n-England-with-you-Birch


--
Carol L. Birch, Storyteller
32B Heritage Circle
Southbury CT 06488
203-264-3800 hm
914-238-3597 fax
--

------------------------------

End of PUBYAC Digest 967
************************